Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/ar-2024-5
https://doi.org/10.5194/ar-2024-5
12 Feb 2024
 | 12 Feb 2024
Status: a revised version of this preprint was accepted for the journal AR and is expected to appear here in due course.

Assessment of light-absorbing carbonaceous aerosol origins and properties at the ATOLL site in Northern France

Alejandra Velazquez-Garcia, Joel F. de Brito, Suzanne Crumeyrolle, Isabelle Chiapello, and Véronique Riffault

Abstract. Understanding the lifecycle of light-absorbing carbonaceous aerosols, from emission to deposition, is critical for assessing their climate impact. This study integrated multi-year aerosol observations from the ATOLL (Lille metropolis, northern France) platform, with air mass back-trajectories and emission inventory as a newly developed ‘INTERPLAY’ approach. Applied to Black Carbon (BC), the method apportioned source contributions (shipping, vehicular, residential heating, industrial) and studied aerosol aging effects, notably on the Brown Carbon (BrC) component. Results estimate that throughout the year, vehicular traffic dominated BC (31 %), followed by shipping (25 %, of which one-third was from canals/rivers) and residential heating (21 %). Comparing INTERPLAY results with the aethalometer model highlights that the ‘residential sector’ BC can be entirely apportioned to BC from wood burning (BCwb), notably in winter, while vehicular traffic corresponds to only about 41 % of BC fossil fuel (BCff) at the ATOLL site, the rest being apportioned to shipping (33 %) and industrial (23 %) emissions. Thus, vehicular traffic and BCff should not be used interchangeably, particularly in regions near intense maritime traffic. Concerning BrC, our analysis confirms a dominant role of residential heating. Focusing on winter, results suggest a considerable decrease in the BrC component only 24 hours after emission, with fresh residential emissions being responsible for 72 % of BrC absorption at ATOLL. Improving our understanding of sources and dynamics of light-absorbing carbonaceous aerosols is crucial for both source abatement strategies as well as a better assessment of their climate impact.

Alejandra Velazquez-Garcia, Joel F. de Brito, Suzanne Crumeyrolle, Isabelle Chiapello, and Véronique Riffault

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on ar-2024-5', Anonymous Referee #1, 29 Feb 2024
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Alejandra Velazquez-Garcia, 04 Apr 2024
  • RC2: 'Comment on ar-2024-5', Anonymous Referee #2, 03 Mar 2024
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Alejandra Velazquez-Garcia, 04 Apr 2024

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on ar-2024-5', Anonymous Referee #1, 29 Feb 2024
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Alejandra Velazquez-Garcia, 04 Apr 2024
  • RC2: 'Comment on ar-2024-5', Anonymous Referee #2, 03 Mar 2024
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Alejandra Velazquez-Garcia, 04 Apr 2024
Alejandra Velazquez-Garcia, Joel F. de Brito, Suzanne Crumeyrolle, Isabelle Chiapello, and Véronique Riffault
Alejandra Velazquez-Garcia, Joel F. de Brito, Suzanne Crumeyrolle, Isabelle Chiapello, and Véronique Riffault

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Short summary
Multi-annual in-situ observations were combined with back-trajectory and emissions inventories to study Black and Brown Carbon (BC, BrC) sources in the north of France. Results show BC to be mainly originated from vehicular traffic (31 %), shipping (25 %), and residential heating (21 %). Also, a significant decrease of the BrC component from residential heating is observed after 24 h of atmospheric aging. Those results shall lead to better climate and air pollution mitigation strategies.
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